The Brain Bucket

Overview of the Triumph Bonneville Street Twin

Feb 19, 2018 8:00:00 AM / by RumbleOn Road Captain

The Triumph Bonneville Street Twin: A Standard Bike Overview

According to the history of Triumph Motorcycles, the British manufacturer came to be after Triumph Engineering went into receivership in 1983. Before then, Triumph Engineering had a record motorcycle production since 1902, and thankfully, new Triumph owner John Bloor did everything he could to maintain the loved look and feel of Triumph. In fact, he even hired back some of the former designers to work on new models.

The ever-popular Triumph Bonneville has been manufactured over three production runs in three generations. The standard motorcycle features a parallel-twin four-stroke engine and was first produced in Meriden, West Midlands, England in 1959. The second series of the Bonneville continued from 1985-1988, and the third series went into production in 2001 and continues to this day with the newest 2018 model.

 


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It’s interesting to note that the Bonneville name came from the legendary Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, where, among many others, Triumph squared up to break the motorcycle land speed records. Among the record-breakers, Triumph, NSU, and Yamaha had a close run of things, with Triumph claiming the top spot four times within seven years.

The family’s high-torque sibling, the Bonneville Street Twin 900cc, was introduced in 2016 and features a design that pays homage to the original Bonneville series both in style and configuration. There’s no shortage of modern engineering, though. The newer Bonnevilles feature an accessible riding position and a low seat; the great handling comes from the bespoke chassis, and rider-focused technology such as Ride by Wire, ABS, and Traction Control delivers and engaging riding experience.

 

As Triumph says, “The torque assist clutch system makes it easy to ride longer with a light touch and feel of the clutch. The electronic ride-by-wire system enhances throttle control, responsiveness, safety, and feel. It incorporates a switchable traction control system that optimizes the delivery of its class-leading torque.” The ride-by-wire fuel-injection and engine management system are engineered with a 270-degree firing interval for linear power delivery. Basically, when you twist the accelerator, electronic throttle body actuators sense this movement and change the throttle opening and supplies air to the engine.

It’s safe to say that the Triumph Bonneville Street Twin has owned both the nostalgia of their heritage, yet embraced the rider amenities expected in a modern classic. It’s everything you could want from an entry level Bonneville, with no shortage of torque.

 

2018 Triumph Bonneville Street Twin Specs

  • Engine: Type: 900cc Liquid cooled, 8 valve, SOHC, 270° crank angle parallel twin
  • Bore/Stroke: 84.6 / 80 mm
  • Compression: 10.55:1
  • Max Power: 55 Hp at 5900rpm
  • Max Torque: 80Nm at 3230rpm
  • Exhaust: Brushed stainless steel, two-into-two exhaust system with twin silencers
  • Final drive: Chain
  • Clutch: Wet, multi-plate assist clutch
  • Transmission: 5-speed
  • Frame: Tubular steel cradle
  • Width: 30.9 inches
  • Height:  43.9 inches
  • Seat Height: 29.5 inches
  • Wheelbase: 55.7 inches
  • Tank Capacity: 3.2 gallons
 

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Topics: Articles, Motorcycles, The Brain Bucket, Reviews

RumbleOn Road Captain

Written by RumbleOn Road Captain

Your fearless leader in all things to do with motorcycle education. I cover tips and advice for motorcycle riders, motorcycle product reviews, and pretty much anything I think is useful to my fellow bikers.

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